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How To Fix Loss Of Suction In A Vacuum Cleaner

Posted on 26 September, 2016 by

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Lost or reduced suction is a rather common occurrence with many vacuum cleaners due to various issues. Before you decide to replace your vacuum, there are a number of things you can try to fix lost suction: Step 1: Diagnose the problem Vacuum cleaners are fairly simple machines. They need power to be transmitted to the vacuum to create a suction force that lifts debris. So, the usual areas that cause suction loss include the wrong height setting, stuck rollers, a faulty gasket, a broken vacuum belt, a filled bag, or a clogged hose. Start by inspecting the easiest issue first. Step 2: Check the height setting If the height setting is too high for the type of floor you are cleaning, the vacuum won’t have enough suction. Vacuums typically come with an adjustment lever or dial to raise or lower it depending on the floor you’re cleaning. The lowest setting is “bare floor”, which should be used for wood, tile, and other hard flooring, since it seals the vacuum to the floor to maximize suction power. The higher your…


Does Suction Alone Make A Vacuum Work Well?

Posted on 12 September, 2016 by

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There’s nothing worse than dragging out the vacuum with the intention of cleaning up a mess, when even the smallest crumbs remain on the floor afterwards. Manufacturers know that consumers want great suction, which is why that’s often a selling point for vacuum brands. While it’s key to a vacuum’s performance, there are a number of factors that contribute to suction, so be sure to look the appliance’s overall design. Power versus suction When looking at the specifications of a vacuum, the power (listed in watts or amps) used by the motor is associated with the strength of suction. However, not all motors are identical, and even if they were, the design of the vacuum can affect how strong the suction is. For example, a vacuum with greater capacity will require a larger motor or at least one that works harder, and both cases will use up more energy, but that doesn’t mean that the vacuum is better at picking up debris. Airflow and sealed suction Airflow is a measurement of the air that moves past a certain threshold as…


Can Carpet Cleaners Poison Your Pets?

Posted on 05 September, 2016 by

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The US American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) Poison Control Centre claims that most of the products available for carpet cleaning are safe for use in households with pets, provided you follow the instructions on the label strictly. That said, pets are more vulnerable to toxic products used inside and outside the home, partly because they roam much closer to carpets, lawns, garage floors, lawns, and hard to reach areas that may conceal chemical residues. Pets are also naturally curious creatures, which, when combined with their lack of awareness for toxic hazards, increases the risk of them encountering substances that could harm their health. That is why the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) claims that 50 per cent of all pet illnesses are caused by indoor pollution, which more or less translates to the household cleaners that contain toxic ingredients such as ammonia, bleach, chlorine, formaldehyde, and glycol ethers. These substances are known to cause cancer, liver and kidney damage, and even anaemia. How to protect your pet from toxic carpet cleaners First, it is important…


Common Vacuuming Mistakes

Posted on 05 September, 2016 by

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If you’ve ever shopped for a vacuum, you’ll notice some higher-end vacuums that offer a variety of settings and features, as suction is a versatile tool for cleaning. In addition to being useful, vacuums also require a certain level of care, which is detailed in user manuals but is easy to overlook or forget after having read it. Here, we review the most useful tips to help you clean like a professional. Don’t vacuum glass Large pieces of glass are too heavy to be sucked into the nozzle, so should be removed either by broom or using a gloved hand. Medium-sized pieces of glass can actually damage the inside of a vacuum by: Being lodged inside the nozzle Scratching up the interior Puncturing the dustbag Don’t vacuum small hard objects In addition to glass, other small, hard objects should either be swept up or removed by hand. This includes: Coins Nails Paper clips Plastic toys Don’t vacuum finely-ground materials Much like a clothes dryer, a vacuum cycles air through the inside and pipes it out of a dedicated vent. To…